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Schindler receives 5 years probation for theft, ongoing criminal conduct

GTNS file photo

Greg Alan Schindler, 54, of Washington, received five years probation for theft and ongoing criminal conduct on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 at the Washington County Courthouse.
GTNS file photo Greg Alan Schindler, 54, of Washington, received five years probation for theft and ongoing criminal conduct on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 at the Washington County Courthouse.

A former bookkeeper for Archer TV and Appliance in Washington recieved five years probation for two felony convictions of theft in the first degree - a Class C felony, and Ongoing Criminal Conduct, a Class B felony on Thursday, Jan. 10.

Greg A. Schindler, 54, was found guilty on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018, after a three-day jury trial found him guilty of stealing more than $24,000 in cash from his employer between 2014 and 2017. In August 2017 a new bookkeeper to Archer discovered the cover-ups and an audit and investigation by the Washington Police department led to charges being filed in October 2017.

Washington County Attorney John Gish requested Schindler be sent to prison while Schindler requested deferred judgment which would allow for the charges to go unnoticed by future employers.

Schindler was not sentenced to prison but was denied a request for deferred judgment, meaning two felony convictions will appear on Schindler’s permanent criminal record. Schindler will be supervised by the Department of Corrections and may serve up to five years of supervised probation.

During sentencing, Archer owner, and Schindler’s former boss Kevin Erpelding, read his victim impact statement aloud, explaining Schindler was embezzling in excess of $24,000 during a time when Erpelding’s family was going through personal troubles, saying to him that his actions “show just how pathetic you really are.”

Erpelding continued to list every date and amount Schindler stole from the company including 13 checks that bounced and Schindler covered up as a result. He explained that Schindler was a military man, father and Boy Scout leader and found it troubling he held such high ranks and responsibilities yet still chose to break a trust Erpelding thought he could have in him.

“My year of personal hell was a year of personal profit for you,” he said. “You were fired because you chose for Archers not to make the money it could ... I trusted you implicitly and look what I got.”