News

Washington County Relay for Life hosted annual event Saturday

GTNS photo by Gretchen Teske

Families gathered together and color coordinated with their teams during the Washington Relay for Life celebration on Saturday, June 22.
GTNS photo by Gretchen Teske Families gathered together and color coordinated with their teams during the Washington Relay for Life celebration on Saturday, June 22.
/

Washington High School was a sea of purple T-shirts on Saturday in honor of the annual Relay for Life Washington County event.

Due to impending storms, the event was moved indoors, but that did not stop more than 200 people from showing up in support. Cancer survivors were encouraged to wear purple while others wore a variety of colors in support of their team. Nineteen teams made it out on Saturday to help raise money for patients and survivors in Washington County.

Deb Conrad, with the American Cancer Society, said this was the 19th year for the event in Washington County. Continuing this event every year is important, she said, because cancer is an on going problem.

“We are creating community awareness about eliminating cancer and we fundraise for research,” she said.

Deb Tisor, the chair for Relay for Life Washington County, said she was happy with the number of people who came out because she feels it’s important people are aware this organization exists locally. Having that community support, she said, shows how strong the area is.

“It means that Washington works together as a community. Even though we’re individuals and come from different ways and different walks of life, we come together,” she said.

Among the teams present on Saturday was Team UP and Friends. The group all wore red T-shirts and walked together for the cause, which they have been doing for about 10 years.

Marde McConnell was a team captain and said Relay for Life is close to her heart because her daughter had cancer 17 years ago. She comes out to walk every year because she wants to raise awareness that although things may be difficult now, there is light at the end of the tunnel.

“It’s important to support researchers looking for a cure. It’s important for people who are dealing with cancer or who have had cancer to be acknowledged for all that they’ve been through,” she said. “It shows that this isn’t the end. That there’s still hope.”